Archive for the ‘Improvementology’ Category

In medicine we use checklists as aide memoirs because they help us to avoid errors of omission, especially in an emergency when we are stressed and less able to think logically.

One that everyone learns if they do a First Aid course is A.B.C. and it stands for Airway, Breathing, Circulation.  It is designed to remind us what to do first because everything that follows depends on it, and then what to do next, and so on.  Avoiding the errors of omission improves outcomes.


In the world of improvement we are interested in change-for-the-better and there are many models of change that we can use to remind us not to omit necessary steps.

One of these is called the Six Steps model (or trans-theoretical model to use the academic title) and it is usually presented as a cycle starting with a state called pre-contemplation.

This change model arose from an empirical study of people who displayed addictive behaviours (e.g. smoking, drinking, drugs etc) and specifically, those who had overcome them without any professional assistance.

The researchers compared the stories from the successful self-healers with the accepted dogma for the management of addictions, and they found something very interesting.  The dogma advocated action, but the stories showed that there were some essential steps before action; steps that should not be omitted.  Specifically, the contemplation and determination steps.

If corrective actions were started too early then the success rate was low.  When the pre-action steps were added the success rate went up … a lot!


The first step is to raise awareness which facilitates a shift from pre-contemplation to contemplation.  The second step is to provide information that gradually increases the pros for change and at the same time gradually decreases the cons for change.

If those phases are managed skillfully then a tipping point is reached where the individual decides to make the change and moves themselves to the third step, the determination or planning phase.

Patience and persistence is required.  The contemplation phase can last a long time.  It is the phase of exploration, evidence and explanation. It is preparing the ground for change and can be summed up in one word: Study.

Often the trigger for determination (i.e. Plan) and then action (i.e. Do) is relatively small because when we are close to the tipping point it does not take much to nudge us to step across the line.


And there is an aide memoir we can use for this change cycle … one that is a bit easier to remember:

A = Awareness
B = Belief
C = Capability
D = Delivery
E = Excellence (+enjoyment, +evidence, +excitement, +engagement)

First we raise awareness of the issue.
Then we learn a solution is possible and that we can learn the know-how.
Then we plan the work.
Then we work the plan.
Then we celebrate what worked and learn from what did and what did not.

Experience shows that the process is not discrete and sequential and it cannot be project managed into defined time boxes.  Instead, it is a continuum and the phases overlap and blend from one to the next in a more fluid and adaptive way.


Raising awareness requires both empathy and courage because this issue is often treated as undiscussable, and even the idea of discussing it is undiscussable too. Taboo.

But for effective change we need to grasp the nettle, explore the current reality, and start the conversation.

One of the really cool things about the 1.3 kg of ChimpWare between our ears is the way it learns.

We have evolved the ability to predict the likely near-future based on a small number of past experiences.

And we do that by creating stored mental models.

Not even the most powerful computers can do it as well as we do – and we doing it without thinking. Literally. It is an unconscious process.

This ability to pro-gnose (‘know before’) gave our ancestors a major survival advantage when we were wandering about on the savanna over 10 million years ago, and we have used this amazing capability to build societies, mega-cities and spaceships.


But this ability is not perfect – it has a flaw – our ChimpOS does not store a picture of reality like a digital camera, it stores a patchy and distorted perception of reality – and then fills in the gaps with guesses (i.e. gaffes).  And we do not notice – consciously.

The cognitive trap is set and sits waiting to be sprung and to trip us up.


Here is an example:

“Improvement implies change”

Yes. That is a valid statement because we can show that whenever improvement has been the effect, then some time before that a change happened.  And we can show that when there are no changes, the system continues to behave as it always has.  Status quo.

The cognitive trap is that our ChimpOS is very good at remembering temporal associations – for example an association between “improvement” and “change” because we remember in the present. So if two concepts are presented at the same time, and we spice the pie with some emotion, then we are more likely to associate them.

The problem comes when we play back the memory … it can come back as …

“change implies improvement” which is not valid.  And we do not notice.

To prove it is not valid we just need to find one example where a change led to a deterioration; an unintended negative consequence, a surprising, confusing and disappointing failure to achieve our intended improvement.

An embarrassing gap between our intent and our impact.

And finding that evidence is not hard. Failures and disappointments in the world of improvement are all too common.


And then we fall into the same cognitive trap because we generalise from a single, bad experience and the lesson our ChimpOS stores for future reference is “change is bad”.

And forever afterwards we feel anxious whenever the idea of change is suggested.

And it is a very effective survival tactic – for a hominid living on the African savanna 10 million years ago, and at risk of falling prey to sharp-fanged, hungry predators.  It is a less useful tactic in the modern world where the risk of being eaten-for-lunch is minimal, and where the pace of change is accelerating.  We must learn to innovate and improve to survive in the social jungle … and we are not well equipped!


Here is another common cognitive trap:

Excellence implies no failures.

Yes. If we are delivering a consistently excellent service then the absence of failures will be a noticeable feature.

No failures implies excellence.

Sadly, this is not a valid inference.  If quality-of-service is measured on a continuum from Excrement-to-Excellent, then we can be delivering a consistently mediocre service, one that is barely adequate, and also have no failures.


The design flaw here is that our ChimpWare/ChimpOS memory system is lossy.

We do not remember all the information required to reconstruct an accurate memory of reality – there is too much information – so we distort, we delete and we generalise.  And we do that because when we evolved it was a good enough solution, and it enabled us to survive as a species, so the ChimpWare/ChimpOS genes were passed on.

We cannot reverse millions of years of evolution.  We cannot get a hardware or software upgrade.  We need to learn to manage with the limitations of what we have between our ears.

And to avoid the cognitive traps we need to practice the discipline of bringing our unconscious assumptions into conscious awareness … and we do that by asking carefully framed questions.

Here is another example to practice with:

A high-efficiency design implies high-utilisation of resources.

Yes, that is valid. Idle resources means wasted resources which means lower efficiency.

Q1: Is the converse also valid?
Q2: Is there any evidence that disproves the converse is valid?

If high-utilisation does not imply high-efficiency, what are the implications of falling into this cognitive trap?  What is the value of measuring utilisation? Does it have a value?

These are useful questions.

It is always rewarding when separate but related ideas come together and go “click”.

And this week I had one of those “ah ha” moments while attempting to explain how the process of engagement works.

Many years ago I was introduced to the conscious-competence model of learning which I found really insightful.  Sometime later I renamed it as the awareness-ability model because the term competence felt too judgmental.

The idea is that when we learn we all start from a position of being unaware of our inability.

A state called blissful ignorance.

And it is only when we try to do something that we become aware of what we cannot do; which can lead to temper tantrums!

As we concentrate and practice our ability improves and we enter the zone of know how.  We become able to demonstrate what we can do, and explain how we are doing it.

The final phase comes when it becomes so habitual that we forget how we learned our skill – it has become second nature.


Some years later I was introduced to the Nerve Curve which is the emotional roller-coaster ride that accompanies change.  Any form of change.

A five-step model was described in the context of bereavement by psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book “On Death & Dying: What the Dying Have to Teach Doctors, Nurses, Clergy and their Families.

More recently this has been extended and applied by authors such as William Bridges and John Fisher in the less emotionally traumatic contexts called transitions.

The characteristic sequence of emotions are triggered by external events are:

  • shock
  • denial
  • frustration
  • blame
  • guilt
  • depression
  • acceptance
  • engagement
  • excitement.

The important messages in both of these models is that we can get stuck along the path of transition, and we can disengage at several points, signalling to others that we have come off the track.  When we do that we exhibit behaviours such as denial, disillusionment and hostility.


More recently I was introduced to the work of the late Chris Argyris and specifically the concept of “defensive reasoning“.

The essence of the concept:  As we start to become aware of a gap between our intentions and our impact, then we feel threatened and our natural reaction is defensive.  This is the essence of the behaviour called “resistance to change”, and it is interesting to note that “smart” people are particularly adept at it.


These three concepts are clearly related in some way … but how?


As a systems engineer I am used to cyclical processes and the concepts of wavelength, amplitude, phase and offset, and I found myself looking at the Awareness-Ability cycle and asking:

“How could that cycle generate the characteristic shape of the transition curve?”

Then the Argyris idea of the gap between intent and impact popped up and triggered another question:

“What if we look at the gap between our ability and our awareness?”

So, I conducted a thought experiment and imagined myself going around the cycle – and charting my ability, awareness and emotional state along the way … and this sketch emerged. Ah ha!

When my awareness exceeded my ability I felt disheartened. That is the defensive reasoning that Chris Argyris talks about, the emotional barrier to self-improvement.


Ability – Awareness = Engagement


This suggested to me that the process of building self-engagement requires opening the ability-versus-awareness gap a little-bit-at-a-time, sensing the emotional discomfort, and then actively releasing the tension by learning a new concept, principle, technique or tool (and usually all four).

Eureka!

I wonder if the same strategy would work elsewhere?

At some point in the life-cycle of an innovation, there is the possibility of crossing an invisible line called the tipping point.

This happens when enough people have experienced the benefits of the innovation and believe that the innovation is the future.  These lone innovators start to connect and build a new community.

It is an emergent behaviour of a complex adaptive system.


This week I experienced what could be a tipping point.

I attended the Q-Community launch event for the West Midlands that was held at the ICC in Birmingham … and it was excellent.

The invited speakers were both engaging and inspiring – boosting the emotional charge in the old engagement batteries; which have become rather depleted of late by the incessant wailing from the all-too-numerous peddlers of doom-and-gloom.

There was an opportunity to re-connect with fellow radicals who, over nearly two decades, have had the persistent temerity to suggest that improvement is necessary, is possible, have invested in learning how to do it, and have disproved the impossibility hypothesis.

There were new connections with like-minded people who want to both share what they know about the science of improvement and to learn what they do not.

And there were hand-outs, side-shows and break-outs.  Something for everyone.


The voice of the Q-Community will grow louder – and for it to be listened to it will need to be patiently and persistently broadcasting the news stories of what has been achieved, and how it was achieved, and who has demonstrated they can walk-the-talk.  News stories like this one:

Improving safety, flow, quality and affordability of unscheduled care of the elderly.


I sincerely hope that in the future, with the benefit of hindsight, we in the West Midlands will say – the 19th July 2017 was our Q-Community tipping point.

And I pledge to do whatever I can to help make that happen.

There is a Catch-22 in health care improvement and it goes a bit like this:

Most people are too busy fire-fighting the chronic chaos to have time to learn how to prevent the chaos, so they are stuck.

There is a deeper Catch-22 as well though:

The first step in preventing chaos is to diagnose the root cause and doing that requires experience, and we don’t have that experience available, and we are too busy fire-fighting to develop it.


Health care is improvement science in action – improving the physical and psychological health of those who seek our help. Patients.

And we have a tried-and-tested process for doing it.

First we study the problem to arrive at a diagnosis; then we design alternative plans to achieve our intended outcome and we decide which plan to go with; and then we deliver the plan.

Study ==> Plan ==> Do.

Diagnose  ==> Design & Decide ==> Deliver.

But here is the catch. The most difficult step is the first one, diagnosis, because there are many different illnesses and they often present with very similar patterns of symptoms and signs. It is not easy.

And if we make a poor diagnosis then all the action plans that follow will be flawed and may lead to disappointment and even harm.

Complaints and litigation follow in the wake of poor diagnostic ability.

So what do we do?

We defer reassuring our patients, we play safe, we request more tests and we refer for second opinions from specialists. Just to be on the safe side.

These understandable tactics take time, cost money and are not 100% reliable.  Diagnostic tests are usually precisely focused to answer specific questions but can have false positive and false negative results.

To request a broad batch of tests in the hope that the answer will appear like a rabbit out of a magician’s hat is … mediocre medicine.


This diagnostic dilemma arises everywhere: in primary care and in secondary care, and in non-urgent and urgent pathways.

And it generates extra demand, more work, bigger queues, longer delays, growing chaos, and mounting frustration, disappointment, anxiety and cost.

The solution is obvious but seemingly impossible: to ensure the most experienced diagnostician is available to be consulted at the start of the process.

But that must be impossible because if the consultants were seeing the patients first, what would everyone else do?  How would they learn to become more expert diagnosticians? And would we have enough consultants?


When I was a junior surgeon I had the great privilege to have the opportunity to learn from wise and experienced senior surgeons, who had seen it, and done it and could teach it.

Mike Thompson is one of these.  He is a general surgeon with a special interest in the diagnosis and treatment of bowel cancer.  And he has a particular passion for improving the speed and accuracy of the diagnosis step; because it can be a life-saver.

Mike is also a disruptive innovator and an early pioneer of the use of endoscopy in the outpatient clinic.  It is called point-of-care testing nowadays, but in the 1980’s it was a radically innovative thing to do.

He also pioneered collecting the symptoms and signs from every patient he saw, in a standard way using a multi-part printed proforma. And he invested many hours entering the raw data into a computer database.

He also did something that even now most clinicians do not do; when he knew the outcome for each patient he entered that into his database too – so that he could link first presentation with final diagnosis.


Mike knew that I had an interest in computer-aided diagnosis, which was a hot topic in the early 1980’s, and also that I did not warm to the Bayesian statistical models that underpinned it.  To me they made too many simplifying assumptions.

The human body is a complex adaptive system. It defies simplification.

Mike and I took a different approach.  We  just counted how many of each diagnostic group were associated with each pattern of presenting symptoms and signs.

The problem was that even his database of 8000+ patients was not big enough! This is why others had resorted to using statistical simplifications.

So we used the approach that an experienced diagnostician uses.  We used the information we had already gleaned from a patient to decide which question to ask next, and then the next one and so on.


And we always have three pieces of information at the start – the patient’s age, gender and presenting symptom.

What surprised and delighted us was how easy it was to use the database to help us do this for the new patients presenting to his clinic; the ones who were worried that they might have bowel cancer.

And what surprised us even more was how few questions we needed to ask arrive at a statistically robust decision to reassure-or-refer for further tests.

So one weekend, I wrote a little computer program that used the data from Mike’s database and our simple bean-counting algorithm to automate this process.  And the results were amazing.  Suddenly we had a simple and reliable way of using past experience to support our present decisions – without any statistical smoke-and-mirror simplifications getting in the way.

The computer program did not make the diagnosis, we were still responsible for that; all it did was provide us with reliable access to a clear and comprehensive digital memory of past experience.


What it then enabled us to do was to learn more quickly by exploring the complex patterns of symptoms, signs and outcomes and to develop our own diagnostic “rules of thumb”.

We learned in hours what it would take decades of experience to uncover. This was hot stuff, and when I presented our findings at the Royal Society of Medicine the audience was also surprised and delighted (and it was awarded the John of Arderne Medal).

So, we called it the Hot Learning System, and years later I updated it with Mike’s much bigger database (29,000+ records) and created a basic web-based version of the first step – age, gender and presenting symptom.  You can have a play if you like … just click HERE.


So what are the lessons here?

  1. We need to have the most experienced diagnosticians at the start of the improvement process.
  2. The first diagnostic assessment can be very quick so long as we have developed evidence-based heuristics.
  3. We can accelerate the training in diagnostic skills using simple information technology and basic analysis techniques.

And exactly the same is true in the health care system improvement.

We need to have an experienced health care improvement practitioner involved at the start, because if we skip this critical study step and move to plan without a correct diagnosis, then we will make errors, poor decisions, and counter-productive actions.  And then generate more work, more queues, more delays, more chaos, more distress and increased costs.

Exactly the opposite of what we want.

Q1: So, how do we develop experienced improvement practitioners more quickly?

Q2: Is there a hot learning system for improvement science?

A: Yes, there is. It can be found here.

Have you heard the phrase “you either love it or you hate it“?  It is called the Marmite Effect.

Improvement science has Marmite-like effect on some people, or more specifically, the theory part does.

Both evidence and experience show that most people prefer to learn-by-doing first; and then consolidate their learning with the minimum, necessary amount of supporting theory.

But that is not how we usually share what we know with others.  We usually attempt to teach the theory first, perhaps in the belief that it will speed up the process of learning.

Sadly, it usually has the opposite effect. Too much theory too soon often creates a barrier to engagement. It actually slows learning down! Which was not the impact we were intending.


The implications of this is that teachers of the science of improvement need to provide a range of different ways to engage with the subject.  Complementary ways.  And leave the choice of which suits whom … to the learner.

And the way to tell if it is working is … the sound of laughter.

Why is that?


Laughing is a complex behaviour that leaves us feeling happier. Which is good.

Comedians make a living from being able to trigger this behaviour in their audiences, and we will gladly part with hard cash when we know something will make us feel better.

And laughing is one of the healthiest ways to feel better!

So why do we laugh when we are learning?

It is believed that one trigger for the laughter reaction is the sudden shift from one perspective to another.  More specifically, a mental shift that relieves a growing emotional tension.  The punch line of a really good joke for example.

And later-in-life learning is often more a process of unlearning.

When we challenge a learned assumption with evidence and if we disprove it … we are unlearning.  And doing that generates emotional tension. We are often very attached to our unconscious assumptions and will usually resist them being challenged.

The way to unlearn effectively is to use the evidence of our own eyes to raise doubts about our unconscious assumptions.  We need to actively generate a bit of confusion.

Then, we resolve the apparent paradox by creatively shifting perspective, often with a real example, a practical explanation or a hands-on demonstration.

And when we experience the “Ah ha! Now I see!” reaction, and we emerge from the fog of confusion, we will relieve the emotional tension and our involuntary reaction is to laugh.

But if our teacher unintentionally triggers a Marmite effect; a “Yeuk, I am NOT enjoying this!” feeling, then we need to respect that, and step back, and adopt a different tack.


Over the last few months I have been experimenting with different approaches to introducing the principles of improvement-by-design.

And the results are clear.

A minority prefer to start with the abstract theory, and then apply it in practice.

The majority have various degrees of Marmite reaction to the theory, and some are so put off that they actively disengage.  But when they have an opportunity to see the same principles demonstrated in a concrete, practical way; they learn and laugh.

Unlearning-by-doing seems to work better for the majority.

So, if you want to have fun and learn how to deliver significant and sustained improvements … then the evidence points to this as the starting point …

… the Flow Design Practical Skills One Day Workshop.

And if you also want to dip into a bit of the tried-and-tested theory that underpins improvement-by-design then you can do that as well, either before or later (when it becomes necessary), or both.


So, to have lots of fun and learn some valuable improvement-by-design practical skills at the same time …  click here.

I am a big fan of pictures that tell a story … and this week I discovered someone who is creating great pictures … Hayley Lewis.

This is one of Hayley’s excellent sketch notes … the one that captures the essence of the Bruce Tuckman model of team development.

The reason that I share this particular sketch-note is because my experience of developing improvement-by-design teams is that it works just like this!

The tricky phase is the STORMING one because not all teams survive it!

About half sink in the storm – and that seems like an awful waste – and I believe it is avoidable.

This means that before starting the team development cycle, the leader needs to be aware of how to navigate themselves and the team through the storm phase … and that requires training, support and practice.

Which is the reason why coaching from a independent, experienced, capable practitioner is a critical element of the improvement process.

stick_figure_superhero_anim_150_wht_1857Have you heard the phrase “Pride comes before a fall“?

What does this mean? That the feeling of pride is the reason for the subsequent fall?

So by following that causal logic, if we do not allow ourselves to feel proud then we can avoid the fall?

And none of us like the feeling of falling and failing. We are fearful of that negative feeling, so with this simple trick we can avoid feeling bad. Yes?

But we all know the positive feeling of achievement – we feel pride when we have done good work, when our impact matches our intent.  Pride in our work.

Is that bad too?

Should we accept under-achievement and unexceptional mediocrity as the inevitable cost of avoiding the pain of possible failure?  Is that what we are being told to do here?


The phrase comes from the Bible, from the Book of Proverbs 16:18 to be precise.

proverb

And the problem here is that the phrase “pride comes before a fall” is not the whole proverb.

It has been simplified. Some bits have been omitted. And those omissions lead to ambiguity and the opportunity for obfuscation and re-interpretation.

pride_goes_before_a_fall
In the fuller New International Version we see a missing bit … the “haughty spirit” bit.  That is another way of saying “over-confident” or “arrogant”.


But even this “authorised” version is still ambiguous and more questions spring to mind:

Q1. What sort of pride are we referring to? Just the confidence version? What about the pride that follows achievement?

Q2. How would we know if our feeling of confidence is actually justified?

Q3. Does a feeling of confidence always precede a fall? Is that how we diagnose over-confidence? Retrospectively? Are there instances when we feel confident but we do not fail? Are there instances when we do not feel confident and then fail?

Q4. Does confidence cause the fall or it is just a temporal association? Is there something more fundamental that causes both high-confidence and low-competence?


There is a well known model called the Conscious-Competence model of learning which generates a sequence of four stages to achieving a new skill. Such as one we need to achieve our intended outcomes.

We all start in the “blissful ignorance” zone of unconscious incompetence.  Our unknowns are unknown to us.  They are blind spots.  So we feel unjustifiably confident.

hierarchy_of_competence

In this model the first barrier to progress is “wrong intuition” which means that we actually have unconscious assumptions that are distorting our perception of reality.

What we perceive makes sense to us. It is clear and obvious. We feel confident. We believe our own rhetoric.

But our unconscious assumptions can trick us into interpreting information incorrectly.  And if we derive decisions from unverified assumptions and invalid analysis then we may do the wrong thing and not achieve our intended outcome.  We may unintentionally cause ourselves to fail and not be aware of it.  But we are proud and confident.

Then the gap between our intent and our impact becomes visible to all and painful to us. So we are tempted to avoid the social pain of public failure by retreating behind the “Yes, But” smokescreen of defensive reasoning. The “doom loop” as it is sometimes called. The Victim Vortex. “Don’t name, shame and blame me, I was doing my best. I did not intent that to happen. To err is human”.


The good news is that this learning model also signposts a possible way out; a door in the black curtain of ignorance.  It suggests that we can learn how to correct our analysis by using feedback from reality to verify our rhetorical assumptions.  Those assumptions which pass the “reality check” we keep, those which fail the “reality check” we redesign and retest until they pass.  Bit by bit our inner rhetoric comes to more closely match reality and the wisdom of our decisions will improve.

And what we then see is improvement.  Our impact moves closer towards our intent. And we can justifiably feel proud of that achievement. We do not need to be best-compared-with-the-rest; just being better-than-we-were-before is OK. That is learning.

the_learning_curve

And this is how it feels … this is the Learning Curve … or the Nerve Curve as we call it.

What it says is that to be able to assess confidence we must also measure competence. Outcomes. Impact.

And to achieve excellence we have to be prepared to actively look for any gap between intent and impact.  And we have to be prepared to see it as an opportunity rather than as a threat. And we will need to be able to seek feedback and other people’s perspectives. And we need to be to open to asking for examples and explanations from those who have demonstrated competence.

It says that confidence is not a trustworthy surrogate for competence.

It says that we want the confidence that flows from competence because that is the foundation of trust.

Improvement flows at the speed of trust and seeing competence, confidence and trust growing is a joyous thing.

Pride and Joy are OK.

Arrogance and incompetence comes before a fall would be a better proverb.

thinker_figure_unsolve_puzzle_150_wht_18309Many of the challenges that we face in delivering effective and affordable health care do not have well understood and generally accepted solutions.

If they did there would be no discussion or debate about what to do and the results would speak for themselves.

This lack of understanding is leading us to try to solve a complicated system design challenge in our heads.  Intuitively.

And trying to do it this way is fraught with frustration and risk because our intuition tricks us. It was this sort of challenge that led Professor Rubik to invent his famous 3D Magic Cube puzzle.

It is difficult enough to learn how to solve the Magic Cube puzzle by trial and error; it is even more difficult to attempt to do it inside our heads! Intuitively.


And we know the Rubik Cube puzzle is solvable, so all we need are some techniques, tools and training to improve our Rubik Cube solving capability.  We can all learn how to do it.


Returning to the challenge of safe and affordable health care, and to the specific problem of unscheduled care, A&E targets, delayed transfers of care (DTOC), finance, fragmentation and chronic frustration.

This is a systems engineering challenge so we need some systems engineering techniques, tools and training before attempting it.  Not after failing repeatedly.

se_vee_diagram

One technique that a systems engineer will use is called a Vee Diagram such as the one shown above.  It shows the sequence of steps in the generic problem solving process and it has the same sequence that we use in medicine for solving problems that patients present to us …

Diagnose, Design and Deliver

which is also known as …

Study, Plan, Do.


Notice that there are three words in the diagram that start with the letter V … value, verify and validate.  These are probably the three most important words in the vocabulary of a systems engineer.


One tool that a systems engineer always uses is a model of the system under consideration.

Models come in many forms from conceptual to physical and are used in two main ways:

  1. To assist the understanding of the past (diagnosis)
  2. To predict the behaviour in the future (prognosis)

And the process of creating a system model, the sequence of steps, is shown in the Vee Diagram.  The systems engineer’s objective is a validated model that can be trusted to make good-enough predictions; ones that support making wiser decisions of which design options to implement, and which not to.


So if a systems engineer presented us with a conceptual model that is intended to assist our understanding, then we will require some evidence that all stages of the Vee Diagram process have been completed.  Evidence that provides assurance that the model predictions can be trusted.  And the scope over which they can be trusted.


Last month a report was published by the Nuffield Trust that is entitled “Understanding patient flow in hospitals”  and it asserts that traffic flow on a motorway is a valid conceptual model of patient flow through a hospital.  Here is a direct quote from the second paragraph in the Executive Summary:

nuffield_report_01
Unfortunately, no evidence is provided in the report to support the validity of the statement and that omission should ring an alarm bell.

The observation that “the hospitals with the least free space struggle the most” is not a validation of the conceptual model.  Validation requires a concrete experiment.


To illustrate why observation is not validation let us consider a scenario where I have a headache and I take a paracetamol and my headache goes away.  I now have some evidence that shows a temporal association between what I did (take paracetamol) and what I got (a reduction in head pain).

But this is not a valid experiment because I have not considered the other seven possible combinations of headache before (Y/N), paracetamol (Y/N) and headache after (Y/N).

An association cannot be used to prove causation; not even a temporal association.

When I do not understand the cause, and I am without evidence from a well-designed experiment, then I might be tempted to intuitively jump to the (invalid) conclusion that “headaches are caused by lack of paracetamol!” and if untested this invalid judgement may persist and even become a belief.


Understanding causality requires an approach called counterfactual analysis; otherwise known as “What if?” And we can start that process with a thought experiment using our rhetorical model.  But we must remember that we must always validate the outcome with a real experiment. That is how good science works.

A famous thought experiment was conducted by Albert Einstein when he asked the question “If I were sitting on a light beam and moving at the speed of light what would I see?” This question led him to the Theory of Relativity which completely changed the way we now think about space and time.  Einstein’s model has been repeatedly validated by careful experiment, and has allowed engineers to design and deliver valuable tools such as the Global Positioning System which uses relativity theory to achieve high positional precision and accuracy.


So let us conduct a thought experiment to explore the ‘faster movement requires more space‘ statement in the case of patient flow in a hospital.

First, we need to define what we mean by the words we are using.

The phrase ‘faster movement’ is ambiguous.  Does it mean higher flow (more patients per day being admitted and discharged) or does it mean shorter length of stage (the interval between the admission and discharge events for individual patients)?

The phrase ‘more space’ is also ambiguous. In a hospital that implies physical space i.e. floor-space that may be occupied by corridors, chairs, cubicles, trolleys, and beds.  So are we actually referring to flow-space or storage-space?

What we have in this over-simplified statement is the conflation of two concepts: flow-capacity and space-capacity. They are different things. They have different units. And the result of conflating them is meaningless and confusing.


However, our stated goal is to improve understanding so let us consider one combination, and let us be careful to be more precise with our terminology, “higher flow always requires more beds“. Does it? Can we disprove this assertion with an example where higher flow required less beds (i.e. space-capacity)?

The relationship between flow and space-capacity is well understood.

The starting point is Little’s Law which was proven mathematically in 1961 by J.D.C. Little and it states:

Average work in progress = Average lead time  X  Average flow.

In the hospital context, work in progress is the number of occupied beds, lead time is the length of stay and flow is admissions or discharges per time interval (which must be the same on average over a long period of time).

(NB. Engineers are rather pedantic about units so let us check that this makes sense: the unit of WIP is ‘patients’, the unit of lead time is ‘days’, and the unit of flow is ‘patients per day’ so ‘patients’ = ‘days’ * ‘patients / day’. Correct. Verified. Tick.)

So, is there a situation where flow can increase and WIP can decrease? Yes. When lead time decreases. Little’s Law says that is possible. We have disproved the assertion.


Let us take the other interpretation of higher flow as shorter length of stay: i.e. shorter length of stay always requires more beds.  Is this correct? No. If flow remains the same then Little’s Law states that we will require fewer beds. This assertion is disproved as well.

And we need to remember that Little’s Law is proven to be valid for averages, does that shed any light on the source of our confusion? Could the assertion about flow and beds actually be about the variation in flow over time and not about the average flow?


And this is also well understood. The original work on it was done almost exactly 100 years ago by Agner Krarup Erlang and the problem he looked at was the quality of customer service of the early telephone exchanges. Specifically, how likely was the caller to get the “all lines are busy, please try later” response.

What Erlang showed was there there is a mathematical relationship between the number of calls being made (the demand), the probability of a call being connected first time (the service quality) and the number of telephone circuits and switchboard operators available (the service cost).


So it appears that we already have a validated mathematical model that links flow, quality and cost that we might use if we substitute ‘patients’ for ‘calls’, ‘beds’ for ‘telephone circuits’, and ‘being connected’ for ‘being admitted’.

And this topic of patient flow, A&E performance and Erlang queues has been explored already … here.

So a telephone exchange is a more valid model of a hospital than a motorway.

We are now making progress in deepening our understanding.


The use of an invalid, untested, conceptual model is sloppy systems engineering.

So if the engineering is sloppy we would be unwise to fully trust the conclusions.

And I share this feedback in the spirit of black box thinking because I believe that there are some valuable lessons to be learned here – by us all.


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bull_by_the_horns_anim_150_wht_9609This week I witnessed an act of courage by someone prepared to take the health care bull by the horns.

On 25th October 2016 a landmark review was published about the integrated health and social care system in Northern Ireland.

It is not a comfortable read.

And the act of courage was the simultaneous publication of the document “Health and Well-being 2026” by Michelle O’Neill, the new Minister of Health.

The full document can be downloaded here.


It is courageous because it says, bluntly, that there is a burning platform, the level of service is not acceptable, doing nothing is not an option, and nothing short of a system-wide redesign will be required.

It is courageous because it sets a clear vision, a burning ambition, and is very clear that this will not be a quick fix. It is a ten year plan.

That implies a constancy of purpose will need to be maintained for at least a decade.

science_of_improvement

And it is courageous because it says that:

we will have to learn how to do this

Here is one paragraph that says that:

Developing the science of improvement can be done at the same time as making improvements

and

We need an infrastructure that makes this possible.”


The good news is that this science of improvement in health care is already well advanced, and it will advance further: a whole health and social care system transformation-by-design is a challenge of some magnitude.

A health and social care system engineering (HSCSE) challenge.


One component of the ten year plan is to develop this capability through a process called co-production.

co-productionNotice that the focus is on pro-actively preventing illness, not just re-actively managing it.

Notice that the design is centered on both the customer and the supplier, not just on the supplier.

And notice that the population served are also expected to be equal partners in the transformation-by-design process.


Courage, constancy of purpose and capability development  … a very welcome breath of fresh air!


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database_transferring_data_150_wht_10400It has been a busy week.

And a common theme has cropped up which I have attempted to capture in the diagram below.

It relates to how the NHS measures itself and how it “drives” improvement.

The measures are called “failure metrics” – mortality, infections, pressure sores, waiting time breaches, falls, complaints, budget overspends.  The list is long.

The data for a specific trust are compared with an arbitrary minimum acceptable standard to decide where the organisation is on the Red-Amber-Green scale.

If we are in the red zone on the RAG chart … we get a kick.  If not we don’t.

The fear of being bullied and beaten raises the emotional temperature and the internal pressure … which drives movement to get away from the pain.  A nematode worm will behave this way. They are not stupid either.

As as we approach the target line our RAG indicator turns “amber” … this is the “not statistically significant zone” … and now the stick is being waggled, ready in case the light goes red again.

So we muster our reserves of emotional energy and we PUSH until our RAG chart light goes green … but then we have to hold it there … which is exhausting.  One pain is replaced by another.

The next step is for the population of NHS nematodes to be compared with each other … they must be “bench-marked”, and some are doing better than others … as we might expect. We have done our “sadistics” training courses.

The bottom 5% or 10% line is used to set the “arbitrary minimum standard target” … and the top 10% are feted at national award ceremonies … and feast on the envy of the other 90 or 95% of “losers”.

The Cream of the Crop now have a big tick in their mission statement objectives box “To be in the Top 10% of Trusts in the UK“.  Hip hip huzzah.

And what has this system design actually achieved? The Cream of the Crap.

Oops!


It is said that every system is perfectly designed to deliver what it delivers.

And a system that has been designed to only use failure and fear to push improvement can only ever achieve chronic mediocrity – either chaotic mediocrity or complacent mediocrity.

So, if we actually do want to tap into the vast zone of unfulfilled potential, and if we do actually want to escape the perpetual pain of the Cream of the Crap Trap forever … we need a better system design.

So we need some system engineers to help us do that.

And this week I met some … at the Royal Academy of Engineering in London … and it felt like finding a candle of hope in the darkness of despair.

I said it had been a busy week!


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CapstanA capstan is a simple machine for combining the effort of many people and enabling them to achieve more than any of them could do alone.

The word appears to have come into English from the Portuguese and Spanish sailors at around the time of the Crusades.

Each sailor works independently of the others. There is no requirement them to be equally strong because the capstan will combine their efforts.  And the capstan also serves as a feedback loop because everyone can sense when someone else pushes harder or slackens off.  It is an example of simple, efficient, effective, elegant design.


In the world of improvement we also need simple, efficient, effective and elegant ways to combine the efforts of many in achieving a common purpose.  Such as raising the standards of excellence and weighing the anchors of resistance.

In health care improvement we have many simultaneous constraints and we have many stakeholders with specific perspectives and special expertise.

And if we are not careful they will tend to pull only in their preferred direction … like a multi-way tug-o-war.  The result?  No progress and exhausted protagonists.

There are those focused on improving productivity – Team Finance.

There are those focused on improving delivery – Team Operations.

There are those focused on improving safety – Team Governance.

And we are all tasked with improving quality – Team Everyone.

So we need a synergy machine that works like a capstan-of-old, and here is one design.

Engine_Of_ExcellenceIt has four poles and it always turns in a clockwise direction, so the direction of push is clear.

And when all the protagonists push in the same direction, they will get their own ‘win’ and also assist the others to make progress.

This is how the sails of success are hoisted to catch the wind of change; and how the anchors of anxiety are heaved free of the rocks of fear; and how the bureaucratic bilge is pumped overboard to lighten our load and improve our speed and agility.

And the more hands on the capstan the quicker we will achieve our common goal.

Collective excellence.

The Harvard Business Review is worth reading because many of its articles challenge deeply held assumptions, and then back up the challenge with the pragmatic experience of those who have succeeded to overcome the limiting beliefs.

So the heading on the April 2016 copy that awaited me on my return from an Easter break caught my eye: YOU CAN’T FIX CULTURE.


 

HBR_April_2016

The successful leaders of major corporate transformations are agreed … the cultural change follows the technical change … and then the emergent culture sustains the improvement.

The examples presented include the Ford Motor Company, Delta Airlines, Novartis – so these are not corporate small fry!

The evidence suggests that the belief of “we cannot improve until the culture changes” is the mantra of failure of both leadership and management.


A health care system is characterised by a culture of risk avoidance. And for good reason. It is all too easy to harm while trying to heal!  Primum non nocere is a core tenet – first do no harm.

But, change and improvement implies taking risks – and those leaders of successful transformation know that the bigger risk by far is to become paralysed by fear and to do nothing.  Continual learning from many small successes and many small failures is preferable to crisis learning after a catastrophic failure!

The UK healthcare system is in a state of chronic chaos.  The evidence is there for anyone willing to look.  And waiting for the NHS culture to change, or pushing for culture change first appears to be a guaranteed recipe for further failure.

The HBR article suggests that it is better to stay focussed; to work within our circles of control and influence; to learn from others where knowledge is known, and where it is not – to use small, controlled experiments to explore new ground.


And I know this works because I have done it and I have seen it work.  Just by focussing on what is important to every member on the team; focussing on fixing what we could fix; not expecting or waiting for outside help; gathering and sharing the feedback from patients on a continuous basis; and maintaining patient and team safety while learning and experimenting … we have created a micro-culture of high safety, high efficiency, high trust and high productivity.  And we have shared the evidence via JOIS.

The micro-culture required to maintain the safety, flow, quality and productivity improvements emerged and evolved along with the improvements.

It was part of the effect, not the cause.


So the concept of ‘fix the system design flaws and the continual improvement culture will emerge’ seems to work at macro-system and at micro-system levels.

We just need to learn how to diagnose and treat healthcare system design flaws. And that is known knowledge.

So what is the next excuse?  Too busy?

figure_pointing_out_chart_data_150_clr_8005It was the time for Bob and Leslie’s regular Improvement Science coaching session.

<Leslie> Hi Bob, how are you today?

<Bob> I am getting over a winter cold but otherwise I am good.  And you?

<Leslie> I am OK and I need to talk something through with you because I suspect you will be able to help.

<Bob> OK. What is the context?

<Leslie> Well, one of the projects that I am involved with is looking at the elderly unplanned admission stream which accounts for less than half of our unplanned admissions but more than half of our bed days.

<Bob> OK. So what were you looking to improve?

<Leslie> We want to reduce the average length of stay so that we free up beds to provide resilient space-capacity to ease the 4-hour A&E admission delay niggle.

<Bob> That sounds like a very reasonable strategy.  So have you made any changes and measured any improvements?

<Leslie> We worked through the 6M Design® sequence. We studied the current system, diagnosed some time traps and bottlenecks, redesigned the ones we could influence, modified the system, and continued to measure to monitor the effect.

<Bob> And?

<Leslie> It feels better but the system behaviour charts do not show an improvement.

<Bob> Which charts, specifically?

<Leslie> The BaseLine XmR charts of average length of stay for each week of activity.

<Bob> And you locked the limits when you made the changes?

<Leslie> Yes. And there still were no red flags. So that means our changes have not had a significant effect. But it definitely feels better. Am I deluding myself?

<Bob> I do not believe so. Your subjective assessment is very likely to be accurate. Our Chimp OS 1.0 is very good at some things! I think the issue is with the tool you are using to measure the change.

<Leslie> The XmR chart?  But I thought that was THE tool to use?

<Bob> Like all tools it is designed for a specific purpose.  Are you familiar with the term Type II Error.

<Leslie> Doesn’t that come from research? I seem to remember that is the error we make when we have an under-powered study.  When our sample size is too small to confidently detect the change in the mean that we are looking for.

<Bob> A perfect definition!  The same error can happen when we are doing before and after studies too.  And when it does, we see the pattern you have just described: the process feels better but we do not see any red flags on our BaseLine© chart.

<Leslie> But if our changes only have a small effect how can it feel better?

<Bob> Because some changes have cumulative effects and we omit to measure them.

<Leslie> OMG!  That makes complete sense!  For example, if my bank balance is stable my average income and average expenses are balanced over time. So if I make a small-but-sustained improvement to my expenses, like using lower cost generic label products, then I will see a cumulative benefit over time to the balance, but not the monthly expenses; because the noise swamps the signal on that chart!

<Bob> An excellent analogy!

<Leslie> So the XmR chart is not the tool for this job. And if this is the only tool we have then we risk making a Type II error. Is that correct?

<Bob> Yes. We do still use an XmR chart first though, because if there is a big enough and fast enough shift then the XmR chart will reveal it.  If there is not then we do not give up just yet; we reach for our more sensitive shift detector tool.

<Leslie> Which is?

<Bob> I will leave you to ponder on that question.  You are a trained designer now so it is time to put your designer hat on and first consider the purpose of this new tool, and then create the outline a fit-for-purpose design.

<Leslie> OK, I am on the case!

british_pound_money_three_bundled_stack_400_wht_2425This week I conducted an experiment – on myself.

I set myself the challenge of measuring the cost of chaos, and it was tougher than I anticipated it would be.

It is easy enough to grasp the concept that fire-fighting to maintain patient safety amidst the chaos of healthcare would cost more in terms of tears and time …

… but it is tricky to translate that concept into hard numbers; i.e. cash.


Chaos is an emergent property of a system.  Safety, delivery, quality and cost are also emergent properties of a system. We can measure cost, our finance departments are very good at that. We can measure quality – we just ask “How did your experience match your expectation”.  We can measure delivery – we have created a whole industry of access target monitoring.  And we can measure safety by checking for things we do not want – near misses and never events.

But while we can feel the chaos we do not have an easy way to measure it. And it is hard to improve something that we cannot measure.


So the experiment was to see if I could create some chaos, then if I could calm it, and then if I could measure the cost of the two designs – the chaotic one and the calm one.  The difference, I reasoned, would be the cost of the chaos.

And to do that I needed a typical chunk of a healthcare system: like an A&E department where the relationship between safety, flow, quality and productivity is rather important (and has been a hot topic for a long time).

But I could not experiment on a real A&E department … so I experimented on a simplified but realistic model of one. A simulation.

What I discovered came as a BIG surprise, or more accurately a sequence of big surprises!

  1. First I discovered that it is rather easy to create a design that generates chaos and danger.  All I needed to do was to assume I understood how the system worked and then use some averaged historical data to configure my model.  I could do this on paper or I could use a spreadsheet to do the sums for me.
  2. Then I discovered that I could calm the chaos by reactively adding lots of extra capacity in terms of time (i.e. more staff) and space (i.e. more cubicles).  The downside of this approach was that my costs sky-rocketed; but at least I had restored safety and calm and I had eliminated the fire-fighting.  Everyone was happy … except the people expected to foot the bill. The finance director, the commissioners, the government and the tax-payer.
  3. Then I got a really big surprise!  My safe-but-expensive design was horribly inefficient.  All my expensive resources were now running at rather low utilisation.  Was that the cost of the chaos I was seeing? But when I trimmed the capacity and costs the chaos and danger reappeared.  So was I stuck between a rock and a hard place?
  4. Then I got a really, really big surprise!!  I hypothesised that the root cause might be the fact that the parts of my system were designed to work independently, and I was curious to see what happened when they worked interdependently. In synergy. And when I changed my design to work that way the chaos and danger did not reappear and the efficiency improved. A lot.
  5. And the biggest surprise of all was how difficult this was to do in my head; and how easy it was to do when I used the theory, techniques and tools of Improvement-by-Design.

So if you are curious to learn more … I have written up the full account of the experiment with rationale, methods, results, conclusions and references and I have published it here.

FreshMeatOldBonesEvolution is an amazing process.

Using the same building blocks that have been around for a lot time, it cooks up innovative permutations and combinations that reveal new and ever more useful properties.

Very often a breakthrough in understanding comes from a simplification, not from making it more complicated.

Knowledge evolves in just the same way.

Sometimes a well understood simplification in one branch of science is used to solve an ‘impossible’ problem in another.

Cross-fertilisation of learning is a healthy part of the evolution process.


Improvement implies evolution of knowledge and understanding, and then application of that insight in the process of designing innovative ways of doing things better.


And so it is in healthcare.  For many years the emphasis on healthcare improvement has been the Safety-and-Quality dimension, and for very good reasons.  We need to avoid harm and we want to achieve happiness; for everyone.

But many of the issues that plague healthcare systems are not primarily SQ issues … they are flow and productivity issues. FP. The safety and quality problems are secondary – so only focussing on them is treating the symptoms and not the cause.  We need to balance the wheel … we need flow science.


Fortunately the science of flow is well understood … outside healthcare … but apparently not so well understood inside healthcare … given the queues, delays and chaos that seem to have become the expected norm.  So there is a big opportunity for cross fertilisation here.  If we choose to make it happen.


For example, from computer science we can borrow the knowledge of how to schedule tasks to make best use of our finite resources and at the same time avoid excessive waiting.

It is a very well understood science. There is comprehensive theory, a host of techniques, and fit-for-purpose tools that we can pick of the shelf and use. Today if we choose to.

So what are the reasons we do not?

Is it because healthcare is quite introspective?

Is it because we believe that there is something ‘special’ about healthcare?

Is it because there is no evidence … no hard proof … no controlled trials?

Is it because we assume that queues are always caused by lack of resources?

Is it because we do not like change?

Is it because we do not like to admit that we do not know stuff?

Is it because we fear loss of face?


Whatever the reasons the evidence and experience shows that most (if not all) the queues, delays and chaos in healthcare systems are iatrogenic.

This means that they are self-generated. And that implies we can un-self-generate them … at little or no cost … if only we knew how.

The only cost is to our egos of having to accept that there is knowledge out there that we could use to move us in the direction of excellence.

New meat for our old bones?

CAS_DiagramThe theme this week has been emergent learning.

By that I mean the ‘ah ha’ moment that happens when lots of bits of a conceptual jigsaw go ‘click’ and fall into place.

When, what initially appears to be smoky confusion suddenly snaps into sharp clarity.  Eureka!  And now new learning can emerge.


This did not happen by accident.  It was engineered.


The picture above is part of a bigger schematic map of a system – in this case a system related to the global health challenge of escalating obesity.

It is a complicated arrangement of boxes and arrows. There are  dotted lines that outline parts of the system that have leaky boundaries like the borders on a political map.

But it is a static picture of the structure … it tells us almost nothing about the function, the system behaviour.

And our intuition tells us that, because it is a complicated structure, it will exhibit complex and difficult to understand behaviour.  So, guided by our inner voice, we toss it into the pile labelled Wicked Problems and look for something easier to work on.


Our natural assumption that a complicated structure always leads to complex behavior is an invalid simplification, and one that we can disprove in a matter of moments.


Exhibit 1. A system can be complicated and yet still exhibit simple, stable and predictable behavior.

Harrison_H1The picture is of a clock designed and built by John Harrison (1693-1776).  It is called H1 and it is a sea clock.

Masters of sailing ships required very accurate clocks to calculate their longitude, the East-West coordinate on the Earth’s surface. And in the 18th Century this was a BIG problem. Too many ships were getting lost at sea.

Harrison’s sea clock is complicated.  It has many moving parts, but it was the most stable and accurate clock of its time.  And his later ones were smaller, more accurate and even more complicated.


Exhibit 2.  A system can be simple yet still exhibit complex, unstable and unpredictable behavior.

Double-compound-pendulumThe image is of a pendulum made of only two rods joined by a hinge.  The structure is simple yet the behavior is complex, and this can only be appreciated with a dynamic visualisation.

The behaviour is clearly not random. It has an emergent structure. It is called chaotic.

So, with these two real examples we have disproved our assumption that a complicated structure always leads to complex behaviour; and we have also disproved its inverse … that complex behavior always comes from a complicated structure.

The cognitive trap we have exposed here is over-generalisation, the unconscious habit of slipping in the implied [always].


This deeper understanding gives us hope.

John Harrison was a rare, naturally-gifted, mechanical genius.  And to make it easier, he was working on a purely mechanical system comprised of non-living parts that only obeyed the Laws of Newtonian physics.  And even with those advantages it took him decades to learn how to design and to build his sea clocks.  He was the first to do so and he was self-educated so his learning was emergent.

If there were a way to design complicated systems to exhibit stable and predictable behaviour, how could more of us learn how to do that?


Our healthcare system is not made of passive, mechanical cogs and springs.  The parts are active, living people whose actions are limited by physical Laws but whose decisions are steered by other policies … learned ones … and ones that can change.  These learned rules of thumb are called heuristics and they vary from person-to-person and from minute-to-minute.  Heuristics can be learned, unlearned, updated, and evolved.

This is called emergent learning.

And to generate it we only need to create the context for it … the rest happens … as if by magic … but only if we design a fit-for-purpose context.


This week I personally observed over a dozen healthcare staff simultaneously re-invent a complicated process scheduling technique, at the same time as using it to eliminate the  queues, waiting and chaos in the system they wanted to improve.

Their queues just evaporated … without requiring any extra capacity or money. Eureka!


We did not show them how to do it so they could not have just copied what we did.

We designed and built the context for their learning to emerge … and it did.  On its own.

The One Day Practical Skills Workshop delivered emergent learning … just as it was designed to do.

A health care system is a complex adaptive system (CAS), and system improvement-by-design is what systems engineers (SE) are trained to do.

And this emerging style of complex adaptive systems engineering (CASE) is at the cutting edge of human knowledge, and when applied in the health care domain it is called health care systems engineering (HCSE).

Our experience of the emergent learning that flows from the practical skills workshops verifies that CASE is both possible, learnable, teachable, applicable and effective.

comparing_information_anim_5545[Bzzzzzz] Bob’s phone vibrated to remind him it was time for the regular ISP remote coaching session with Leslie. He flipped the lid of his laptop just as Leslie joined the virtual meeting.

<Leslie> Hi Bob, and Happy New Year!

<Bob> Hello Leslie and I wish you well in 2016 too.  So, what shall we talk about today?

<Leslie> Well, given the time of year I suppose it should be the Winter Crisis.  The regularly repeating annual winter crisis. The one that feels more like the perpetual winter crisis.

<Bob> OK. What specifically would you like to explore?

<Leslie> Specifically? The habit of comparing of this year with last year to answer the burning question “Are we doing better, the same or worse?”  Especially given the enormous effort and political attention that has been focused on the hot potato of A&E 4-hour performance.

<Bob> Aaaaah! That old chestnut! Two-Points-In-Time comparison.

<Leslie> Yes. I seem to recall you usually add the word ‘meaningless’ to that phrase.

<Bob> H’mm.  Yes.  It can certainly become that, but there is a perfectly good reason why we do this.

<Leslie> Indeed, it is because we see seasonal cycles in the data so we only want to compare the same parts of the seasonal cycle with each other. The apples and oranges thing.

<Bob> Yes, that is part of it. So what do you feel is the problem?

<Leslie> It feels like a lottery!  It feels like whether we appear to be better or worse is just the outcome of a random toss.

<Bob> Ah!  So we are back to the question “Is the variation I am looking at signal or noise?” 

<Leslie> Yes, exactly.

<Bob> And we need a scientifically robust way to answer it. One that we can all trust.

<Leslie> Yes.

<Bob> So how do you decide that now in your improvement work?  How do you do it when you have data that does not show a seasonal cycle?

<Leslie> I plot-the-dots and use an XmR chart to alert me to the presence of the signals I am interested in – especially a change of the mean.

<Bob> Good.  So why can we not use that approach here?

<Leslie> Because the seasonal cycle is usually a big signal and it can swamp the smaller change I am looking for.

<Bob> Exactly so. Which is why we have to abandon the XmR chart and fall back the two points in time comparison?

<Leslie> That is what I see. That is the argument I am presented with and I have no answer.

<Bob> OK. It is important to appreciate that the XmR chart was not designed for doing this.  It was designed for monitoring the output quality of a stable and capable process. It was designed to look for early warning signs; small but significant signals that suggest future problems. The purpose is to alert us so that we can identify the root causes, correct them and the avoid a future problem.

<Leslie> So we are using the wrong tool for the job. I sort of knew that. But surely there must be a better way than a two-points-in-time comparison!

<Bob> There is, but first we need to understand why a TPIT is a poor design.

<Leslie> Excellent. I’m all ears.

<Bob> A two point comparison is looking at the difference between two values, and that difference can be positive, zero or negative.  In fact, it is very unlikely to be zero because noise is always present.

<Leslie> OK.

<Bob> Now, both of the values we are comparing are single samples from two bigger pools of data.  It is the difference between the pools that we are interested in but we only have single samples of each one … so they are not measurements … they are estimates.

<Leslie> So, when we do a TPIT comparison we are looking at the difference between two samples that come from two pools that have inherent variation and may or may not actually be different.

<Bob> Well put.  We give that inherent variation a name … we call it variance … and we can quantify it.

<Leslie> So if we do many TPIT comparisons then they will show variation as well … for two reasons; first because the pools we are sampling have inherent variation; and second just from the process of sampling itself.  It was the first lesson in the ISP-1 course.

<Bob> Well done!  So the question is: “How does the variance of the TPIT sample compare with the variance of the pools that the samples are taken from?”

<Leslie> My intuition tells me that it will be less because we are subtracting.

<Bob> Your intuition is half-right.  The effect of the variation caused by the signal will be less … that is the rationale for the TPIT after all … but the same does not hold for the noise.

<Leslie> So the noise variation in the TPIT is the same?

<Bob> No. It is increased.

<Leslie> What! But that would imply that when we do this we are less likely to be able to detect a change because a small shift in signal will be swamped by the increase in the noise!

<Bob> Precisely.  And the degree that the variance increases by is mathematically predictable … it is increased by a factor of two.

<Leslie> So as we usually present variation as the square root of the variance, to get it into the same units as the metric, then that will be increased by the square root of two … 1.414

<Bob> Yes.

<Leslie> I need to put this counter-intuitive theory to the test!

<Bob> Excellent. Accept nothing on faith. Always test assumptions. And how will you do that?

<Leslie> I will use Excel to generate a big series of normally distributed random numbers; then I will calculate a series of TPIT differences using a fixed time interval; then I will calculate the means and variations of the two sets of data; and then I will compare them.

<Bob> Excellent.  Let us reconvene in ten minutes when you have done that.


10 minutes later …


<Leslie> Hi Bob, OK I am ready and I would like to present the results as charts. Is that OK?

<Bob> Perfect!

<Leslie> Here is the first one.  I used our A&E performance data to give me some context. We know that on Mondays we have an average of 210 arrivals with an approximately normal distribution and a standard deviation of 44; so I used these values to generate the random numbers. Here is the simulated Monday Arrivals chart for two years.

TPIT_SourceData

<Bob> OK. It looks stable as we would expect and I see that you have plotted the sigma levels which look to be just under 50 wide.

<Leslie> Yes, it shows that my simulation is working. So next is the chart of the comparison of arrivals for each Monday in Year 2 compared with the corresponding week in Year 1.

TPIT_DifferenceData <Bob> Oooookaaaaay. What have we here?  Another stable chart with a mean of about zero. That is what we would expect given that there has not been a change in the average from Year 1 to Year 2. And the variation has increased … sigma looks to be just over 60.

<Leslie> Yes!  Just as the theory predicted.  And this is not a spurious answer. I ran the simulation dozens of times and the effect is consistent!  So, I am forced by reality to accept the conclusion that when we do two-point-in-time comparisons to eliminate a cyclical signal we will reduce the sensitivity of our test and make it harder to detect other signals.

<Bob> Good work Leslie!  Now that you have demonstrated this to yourself using a carefully designed and conducted simulation experiment, you will be better able to explain it to others.

<Leslie> So how do we avoid this problem?

<Bob> An excellent question and one that I will ask you to ponder on until our next chat.  You know the answer to this … you just need to bring it to conscious awareness.


 

take_a_walk_text_10710One of the barriers to improvement is jumping to judgment too quickly.

Improvement implies innovation and action …

doing something different …

and getting a better outcome.

Before an action is a decision.  Before a decision is a judgment.

And we make most judgments quickly, intuitively and unconsciously.  Our judgments are a reflection of our individual, inner view of the world. Our mental model.

So when we judge intuitively and quickly then we will actually just reinforce our current worldview … and in so doing we create a very effective barrier to learning and improvement.

We guarantee the status quo.


So how do we get around this barrier?

In essence we must train ourselves to become more consciously aware of the judgment step in our thinking process.  And one way to flush it up to the surface is to ask the deceptively powerful question … And?

When someone is thinking through a problem then an effective contribution that we can offer is to listen, reflect, summarize, clarify and to encourage by asking “And?”

This process has a name.  It is called a coaching conversation.

And anyone can learn to how do it. Anyone.

business_race__PA_150_wht_3222There is a widely held belief that competition is the only way to achieve improvement.

This is a limiting belief.

But our experience tells us that competition is an essential part of improvement!

So which is correct?


When two athletes compete they both have to train hard to improve their individual performance. The winner of the race is the one who improves the most.  So by competing with each other they are forced to improve.

The goal of improvement is excellence and the test-of-excellence is performed in the present and is done by competing with others. The most excellent is labelled the “best” or “winner”. Everyone else is branded “second best” or “loser”.

This is where we start to see the limiting belief of competition.

It has a crippling effect.  Many competitive people will not even attempt the race if they do not feel they can win.  Their limiting belief makes them too fearful. They fear loss of self-esteem. Their ego is too fragile. They value hubris more than humility. And by not taking part they abdicate any opportunity to improve. They remain arrogantly mediocre and blissfully ignorant of it. They are the real losers.


So how can we keep the positive effect of competition and at the same time escape the limiting belief?

There are two ways:

First we drop the assumption that the only valid test of excellence is a comparison of us with others in the present.  And instead we adopt the assumption that it is equally valid to compare us with ourselves in the past.

We can all improve compared with what we used to be. We can all be winners of that race.

And as improvement happens our perspective shifts.  What becomes normal in the present would have been assumed to be impossible in the past.


This week I sat at my desk in a state of wonder.

I held in my hand a small plastic widget about the size of the end of my thumb.  It was a new USB data stick that had just arrived, courtesy of Amazon, and on one side in small white letters it proudly announced that it could hold 64 Gigabytes of data (that is 64 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024). And it cost less than a take-away curry.

About 30 years ago, when I first started to learn how to design, build and program computer system, a memory chip that was about the same size and same cost could hold 4 kilobytes (4 x 1024).  

So in just 30 years we have seen a 16-million-fold increase in data storage capacity. That is astounding! Our collective knowledge of how to design and build memory chips has improved so much. And yet we take it for granted.


The second way to side-step the limiting belief is even more powerful.

It is to drop the belief that individual improvement is enough.

Collective improvement is much, much, much more effective.


Cell_StructureEvidence:

The human body is made up of about 50 trillion (50 x 1000 x 1000 x 1000 x 1000) cells – about the same as the number of bytes could store on 1000 of my wonderful new 64 Gigabyte data sticks!

And each cell is a microscopic living individual. A nano-engineered adaptive system of wondrous complexity and elegance.

Each cell breathes, eats, grows, moves, reproduces, senses, learns and remembers. These cells are really smart too! And they talk to each other, and they learn from each other.

And what makes the human possible is that its community of 50 trillion smart cells are a collaborative community … not a competitive community.

If all our cells started to compete with each other we would be very quickly reduced to soup (which is what the Earth was bathed in for about 2.7 billions years).

The first multi-celled organisms gained a massive survival advantage when they learned how to collaborate.

The rest is the Story of Evolution.  Even Charles Darwin missed the point – evolution is more about collaboration than competition – and we are only now beginning to learn that lesson. The hard way.  


come_join_the_team_150_wht_10876So survival is about learning and improving.

And survival of the fittest does not mean the fittest individual … it means the fittest group.

Collaborative improvement is the process through which we can all achieve win-win-win excellence.

And the understanding of how to do this collaborative improvement has a name … it is called Improvement Science.

smack_head_in_disappointment_150_wht_16653The NHS appears to be suffering from some form of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

OCD sufferers feel extreme anxiety in certain situations. Their feelings drive their behaviour which is to reduce the perceived cause of their feelings. It is a self-sustaining system because their perception is distorted and their actions are largely ineffective. So their anxiety is chronic.

Perfectionists demonstrate a degree of obsessive-compulsive behaviour too.


In the NHS the triggers are called ‘targets’ and usually take the form of failure metrics linked to arbitrary performance specifications.

The anxiety is the fear of failure and its unpleasant consequences: the name-shame-blame-game.


So a veritable industry has grown around ways to mitigate the fear. A very expensive and only partially effective industry.

Data is collected, cleaned, manipulated and uploaded to the Mothership (aka NHS England). There it is further manipulated, massaged and aggregated. Then the accumulated numbers are posted on-line, every month for anyone with a web-browser to scrutinise and anyone with an Excel spreadsheet to analyse.

An ocean of measurements is boiled and distilled into a few drops of highly concentrated and sanitized data and, in the process, most of the useful information is filtered out, deleted or distorted.


For example …

One of the failure metrics that sends a shiver of angst through a Chief Operating Officer (COO) is the failure to deliver the first definitive treatment for any patient within 18 weeks of referral from a generalist to a specialist.

The infamous and feared 18-week target.

Service providers, such as hospitals, are actually fined by their Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) for failing to deliver-on-time. Yes, you heard that right … one NHS organisation financially penalises another NHS organisation for failing to deliver a result over which they have only partial control.

Service providers do not control how many patients are referred, or a myriad of other reasons that delay referred patients from attending appointments, tests and treatments. But the service providers are still accountable for the outcome of the whole process.

This ‘Perform-or-Pay-The-Price Policy‘ creates the perfect recipe for a lot of unhappiness for everyone … which is exactly what we hear and what we see.


So what distilled wisdom does the Mothership share? Here is a snapshot …

RTT_Data_Snapshot

Q1: How useful is this table of numbers in helping us to diagnose the root causes of long waits, and how does it help us to decide what to change in our design to deliver a shorter waiting time and more productive system?

A1: It is almost completely useless (in this format).


So what actually happens is that the focus of management attention is drawn to the part just before the speed camera takes the snapshot … the bit between 14 and 18 weeks.

Inside that narrow time-window we see a veritable frenzy of target-failure-avoiding behaviour.

Clinical priority is side-lined and management priority takes over.  This is a management emergency! After all, fines-for-failure are only going to make the already bad financial situation even worse!

The outcome of this fire-fighting is that the bigger picture is ignored. The focus is on the ‘whip’ … and avoiding it … because it hurts!


Message from the Mothership:    “Until morale improves the beatings will continue”.


The good news is that the undigestible data liquor does harbour some very useful insights.  All we need to do is to present it in a more palatable format … as pictures of system behaviour over time.

We need to use the data to calculate the work-in-progress (=WIP).

And then we need to plot the WIP in time-order so we can see how the whole system is behaving over time … how it is changing and evolving. It is a dynamic living thing, it has vitality.

So here is the WIP chart using the distilled wisdom from the Mothership.

RTT_WIP_RunChart

And this picture does not require a highly trained data analyst or statistician to interpret it for us … a Mark I eyeball linked to 1.3 kg of wetware running ChimpOS 1.0 is enough … and if you are reading this then you must already have that hardware and software.

Two patterns are obvious:

1) A cyclical pattern that appears to have an annual frequency, a seasonal pattern. The WIP is higher in the summer than in the winter. Eh? What is causing that?

2) After an initial rapid fall in 2008 the average level was steady for 4 years … and then after March 2012 it started to rise. Eh? What is causing is that?

The purpose of a WIP chart is to stimulate questions such as:

Q1: What happened in March 2012 that might have triggered this change in system behaviour?

Q2: What other effects could this trigger have caused and is there evidence for them?


A1: In March 2012 the Health and Social Care Act 2012 became Law. In the summer of 2012 the shiny new and untested Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) were authorised to take over the reins from the exiting Primary care Trusts (PCTs) and Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs). The vast £80bn annual pot of tax-payer cash was now in the hands of well-intended GPs who believed that they could do a better commissioning job than non-clinicians. The accountability for outcomes had been deftly delegated to the doctors.  And many of the new CCG managers were the same ones who had collected their redundancy checks when the old system was shut down. Now that sounds like a plausible system-wide change! A massive political experiment was underway and the NHS was the guinea-pig.

A2: Another NHS failure metric is the A&E 4-hour wait target which, worringly, also shows a deterioration that appears to have started just after July 2010, i.e. just after the new Government was elected into power.  Maybe that had something to do with it? Maybe it would have happened whichever party won at the polls.

A&E_Breaches_2004-15

A plausible temporal association does not constitute proof – and we cannot conclude a political move to a CCG-led NHS has caused the observed behaviour. Retrospective analysis alone is not able to establish the cause.

It could just as easily be that something else caused these behaviours. And it is important to remember that there are usually many causal factors combining together to create the observed effect.

And unraveling that Gordian Knot is the work of analysts, statisticians, economists, historians, academics, politicians and anyone else with an opinion.


We have a more pressing problem. We have a deteriorating NHS that needs urgent resuscitation!


So what can we do?

One thing we can do immediately is to make better use of our data by presenting it in ways that are easier to interpret … such as a work in progress chart.

Doing that will trigger different conversions; ones spiced with more curiosity and laced with less cynicism.

We can add more context to our data to give it life and meaning. We can season it with patient and staff stories to give it emotional impact.

And we can deepen our understanding of what causes lead to what effects.

And with that deeper understanding we can begin to make wiser decisions that will lead to more effective actions and better outcomes.

This is all possible. It is called Improvement Science.


And as we speak there is an experiment running … a free offer to doctors-in-training to learn the foundations of improvement science in healthcare (FISH).

In just two weeks 186 have taken up that offer and 13 have completed the course!

And this vanguard of curious and courageous innovators have discovered a whole new world of opportunity that they were completely unaware of before. But not anymore!

So let us ease off applying the whip and ease in the application of WIP.


PostScript

Here is a short video describing how to create, animate and interpret a form of diagnostic Vitals Chart® using the raw data published by NHS England.  This is a training exercise from the Improvement Science Practitioner (level 2) course.

How to create an 18 weeks animated Bucket Brigade Chart (BBC)

 

RIA_graphicA question that is often asked by doctors in particular is “What is the difference between Research, Audit and Improvement Science?“.

It is a very good question and the diagram captures the essence of the answer.

Improvement science is like a bridge between research and audit.

To understand why that is we first need to ask a different question “What are the purposes of research, improvement science and audit? What do they do?

In a nutshell:

Research provides us with new knowledge and tells us what the right stuff is.
Improvement Science provides us with a way to design our system to do the right stuff.
Audit provides us with feedback and tells us if we are doing the right stuff right.


Research requires a suggestion and an experiment to test it.   A suggestion might be “Drug X is better than drug Y at treating disease Z”, and the experiment might be a randomised controlled trial (RCT).  The way this is done is that subjects with disease Z are randomly allocated to two groups, the control group and the study group.  A measure of ‘better’ is devised and used in both groups. Then the study group is given drug X and the control group is given drug Y and the outcomes are compared.  The randomisation is needed because there are always many sources of variation that we cannot control, and it also almost guarantees that there will be some difference between our two groups. So then we have to use sophisticated statistical data analysis to answer the question “Is there a statistically significant difference between the two groups? Is drug X actually better than drug Y?”

And research is often a complicated and expensive process because to do it well requires careful study design, a lot of discipline, and usually large study and control groups. It is an effective way to help us to know what the right stuff is but only in a generic sense.


Audit requires a standard to compare with and to know if what we are doing is acceptable, or not. There is no randomisation between groups but we still need a metric and we still need to measure what is happening in our local reality.  We then compare our local experience with the global standard and, because variation is inevitable, we have to use statistical tools to help us perform that comparison.

And very often audit focuses on avoiding failure; in other words the standard is a ‘minimum acceptable standard‘ and as long as we are not failing it then that is regarded as OK. If we are shown to be failing then we are in trouble!

And very often the most sophisticated statistical tool used for audit is called an average.  We measure our performance, we average it over a period of time (to remove the troublesome variation), and we compare our measured average with the minimum standard. And if it is below then we are in trouble and if it is above then we are not.  We have no idea how reliable that conclusion is though because we discounted any variation.


A perfect example of this target-driven audit approach is the A&E 95% 4-hour performance target.

The 4-hours defines the metric we are using; the time interval between a patient arriving in A&E and them leaving. It is called a lead time metric. And it is easy to measure.

The 95% defined the minimum  acceptable average number of people who are in A&E for less than 4-hours and it is usually aggregated over three months. And it is easy to measure.

So, if about 200 people arrive in a hospital A&E each day and we aggregate for 90 days that is about 18,000 people in total so the 95% 4-hour A&E target implies that we accept as OK for about 900 of them to be there for more than 4-hours.

Do the 900 agree? Do the other 17,100?  Has anyone actually asked the patients what they would like?


The problem with this “avoiding failure” mindset is that it can never lead to excellence. It can only deliver just above the minimum acceptable. That is called mediocrity.  It is perfectly possible for a hospital to deliver 100% on its A&E 4 hour target by designing its process to ensure every one of the 18,000 patients is there for exactly 3 hours and 59 minutes. It is called a time-trap design.

We can hit the target and miss the point.

And what is more the “4-hours” and the “95%” are completely arbitrary numbers … there is not a shred of research evidence to support them.

So just this one example illustrates the many problems created by having a gap between research and audit.


And that is why we need Improvement Science to help us to link them together.

We need improvement science to translate the global knowledge and apply it to deliver local improvement in whatever metrics we feel are most important. Safety metrics, flow metrics, quality metrics and productivity metrics. Simultaneously. To achieve system-wide excellence. For everyone, everywhere.

When we learn Improvement Science we learn to measure how well we are doing … we learn the power of measurement of success … and we learn to avoid averaging because we want to see the variation. And we still need a minimum acceptable standard because we want to exceed it 100% of the time. And we want continuous feedback on just how far above the minimum acceptable standard we are. We want to see how excellent we are, and we want to share that evidence and our confidence with our patients.

We want to agree a realistic expectation rather than paint a picture of the worst case scenario.

And when we learn Improvement Science we will see very clearly where to focus our improvement efforts.


Improvement Science is the bit in the middle.


Stop Press:  There is currently an offer of free on-line foundation training in improvement science for up to 1000 doctors-in-training … here  … and do not dally because places are being snapped up fast!

Rogers_CurveThe early phases of a transformation are where most fall by the wayside.

And the failure rate is horrifying – an estimated 80% of improvement initiatives fail to achieve their goals.

The recent history of the NHS is littered with the rusting wreckage of a series of improvement bandwagons.  Many who survived the crashes are too scarred and too scared to try again.


Transformation and improvement imply change which implies innovation … new ways of thinking, new ways of behaving, new techniques, new tools, and new ways of working.

And it has been known for over 50 years that innovation spreads in a very characteristic way. This process was described by Everett Rogers in a book called ‘Diffusion of Innovations‘ and is described visually in the diagram above.

The horizontal axis is a measure of individual receptiveness to the specific innovation … and the labels are behaviours: ‘I exhibit early adopter behaviour‘ (i.e. not ‘I am an early adopter’).

What Roger’s discovered through empirical observation was that in all cases the innovation diffuses from left-to-right; from innovation through early adoption to the ‘silent’ majority.


Complete diffusion is not guaranteed though … there are barriers between the phases.

One barrier is between innovation and early adoption.

There are many innovations that we never hear about and very often the same innovation appears in many places and often around the same time.

This innovation-adoption barrier is caused by two things:
1) most are not even aware of the problem … they are blissfully ignorant;
2) news of the innovation is not shared widely enough.

Innovators are sensitive people.  They sense there is a problem long before others do. They feel the fear and the excitement of need for innovation. They challenge their own assumptions and they actively seek solutions. They swim against the tide of ignorance, disinterest, skepticism and often toxic cynicism.  So when they do discover a way forward they often feel nervous about sharing it. They have learned (the hard way) that the usual reaction is to be dismissed and discounted.  Most people do not like to learn about unknown problems and hazards; and they like it even less to learn that there are solutions that they neither recognise nor understand.


But not everyone.

There is a group called the early adopters who, like the innovators, are aware of the problem. They just do not share the innovator’s passion to find a solution … irrespective of the risks … so they wait … their antennae tuned for news that a solution has been found.

Then they act.

And they act in one of two ways:

1) Talkers … re-transmit the news of the problem and the discovery of a generic solution … which is essential in building awareness.

2) Walkers … try the innovative approach themselves and in so doing learn a lot about their specific problem and the new ways to solving it.

And it is the early adopters that do both of these actions that are the most effective and the most valuable to everyone else.  Those that talk-the-new-walk and walk-the-new-talk.

And we can identify who they are because they will be able to tell stories of how they have applied the innovation in their world; and the results that they have achieved; and how they achieved them; and what worked well; and what did not; and what they learned; and how they evolved and applied the innovation to meet their specific needs.

They are the leaders, the coaches and the teachers of improvement and transformation.

They See One, Do Some, and Teach Many.

The early adopters are the bridge across the Innovation and Transformation Chasm.

Dr_Bob_ThumbnailThere is a big bun-fight kicking off on the topic of 7-day working in the NHS.

The evidence is that there is a statistical association between mortality in hospital of emergency admissions and day of the week: and weekends are more dangerous.

There are fewer staff working at weekends in hospitals than during the week … and delays and avoidable errors increase … so risk of harm increases.

The evidence also shows that significantly fewer patients are discharged at weekends.


So the ‘obvious’ solution is to have more staff on duty at weekends … which will cost more money.


Simple, obvious, linear and wrong.  Our intuition has tricked us … again!


Let us unravel this Gordian Knot with a bit of flow science and a thought experiment.

1. The evidence shows that there are fewer discharges at weekends … and so demonstrates lack of discharge flow-capacity. A discharge process is not a single step, there are many things that must flow in sync for a discharge to happen … and if any one of them is missing or delayed then the discharge does not happen or is delayed.  The weakest link effect.

2. The evidence shows that the number of unplanned admissions varies rather less across the week; which makes sense because they are unplanned.

3. So add those two together and at weekends we see hospitals filling up with unplanned admissions – not because the sick ones are arriving faster – but because the well ones are leaving slower.

4. The effect of this is that at weekends the queue of people in beds gets bigger … and they need looking after … which requires people and time and money.

5. So the number of staffed beds in a hospital must be enough to hold the biggest queue – not the average or some fudged version of the average like a 95th percentile.

6. So a hospital running a 5-day model needs more beds because there will be more variation in bed use and we do not want to run out of beds and delay the admission of the newest and sickest patients. The ones at most risk.

7. People do not get sicker because there is better availability of healthcare services – but saying we need to add more unplanned care flow capacity at weekends implies that it does.  What is actually required is that the same amount of flow-resource that is currently available Mon-Fri is spread out Mon-Sun. The flow-capacity is designed to match the customer demand – not the convenience of the supplier.  And that means for all parts of the system required for unplanned patients to flow.  What, where and when. It costs the same.

8. Then what happens is that the variation in the maximum size of the queue of patients in the hospital will fall and empty beds will appear – as if by magic.  Empty beds that ensure there is always one for a new, sick, unplanned admission on any day of the week.

9. And empty beds that are never used … do not need to be staffed … so there is a quick way to reduce expensive agency staff costs.

So with a comprehensive 7-day flow-capacity model the system actually gets safer, less chaotic, higher quality and less expensive. All at the same time. Safety-Flow-Quality-Productivity.

knee_jerk_reflexA commonly used technique for continuous improvement is the Plan-Do-Study-Act or PDSA cycle.

This is a derivative of the PDCA cycle first described by Walter Shewhart in the 1930’s … where C is Check.

The problem with PDSA is that improvement does not start with a plan, it starts with some form of study … so SAPD would be a better order.


IHI_MFITo illustrate this point if we look at the IHI Model for Improvement … the first step is a pair of questions related to purpose “What are we trying to accomplish?” and “How will we know a change is an improvement?

With these questions we are stepping back and studying our shared perspective of our desired future.

It is a conscious and deliberate act.

We are examining our mental models … studying them … and comparing them.  We have not reached a diagnosis or a decision yet, so we cannot plan or do yet.

The third question is a combination of diagnosis and design … we need to understand our current state in order to design changes that will take up to our improved future state.

We cannot plan what to do or how to do it until we have decided and agreed what the future design will look like, and tested that our proposed future design is fit-4-purpose.


So improvement by discovery or by design does not start with plan, it starts with study.


And another word for study is ‘sense’ which may be a better one … because study implies a deliberate, conscious, often slow process … while sense is not so restrictive.

Very often our actions are not the result of a deliberative process … they are automatic and reflex. We do not think about them. They just sort of happen.

The image of the knee-jerk reflex illustrates the point.

In fact we have little conscious control over these automatic motor reflexes which respond much more quickly than our conscious thinking process can.  We are aware of the knee jerk after it has happened, not before, so we may be fooled into thinking that we ‘Do’ without a ‘Plan’.  But when we look in more detail we can see the sensory input and the hard-wired ‘plan’ that links to to motor output.  Study-Plan-Do.


The same is true for many other actions – our unconscious mind senses, processes, decides, plans and acts long before we are consciously aware … and often the only clue we have is a brief flash of emotion … and usually not even that.  Our behaviour is largely habitual.


And even in situations when we need to make choices the sense-recognise-act process is fast … such as when a patient suddenly becomes very ill … we switch into the Resuscitate mode which is a pre-planned sequence of steps that is guided by what are sensing … but it is not made up on the spot. There is no committee. No meetings. We just do what we have learned and practiced how to do … because it was designed to.   It still starts with Study … it is just that the Study phase is very short … we just need enough information to trigger the pre-prepared plan. ABC – Airway … Breathing … Circulation. No discussion. No debate.


So, improvement starts with Study … and depending on what we sense what happens next will vary … and it will involve some form of decision and plan.

1. Unconscious, hard-wired, knee jerk reflex.
2. Unconscious, learned, habitual behaviour.
3. Conscious, pre-planned, steered response.
4. Conscious, deliberation-diagnosis-design then delivery.

The difference is just the context and the timing.   They are all Study-Plan-Do.

 And the Plan may be to Do Nothing …. the Deliberate Act of Omission.


And when we go-and-see and study the external reality we sometimes get a surprise … what we see is not what we expect. We feel a sense of confusion. And before we can plan we need to adjust our mental model so that it better matches reality. We need to establish clarity.  And in this situation we are doing Study-Adjust-Plan-Do …. S(A)PD.

There comes a point in every improvement journey when it is time to celebrate and share. This is the most rewarding part of the Improvement Science Practitioner (ISP) coaching role so I am going to share a real celebration that happened this week.

The picture shows Chris Jones holding his well-earned ISP-1 Certificate of Competence.  The “Maintaining the Momentum of Medicines”  redesign project is shown on the poster on the left and it is the tangible Proof of Competence. The hard evidence that the science of improvement delivers.

Chris_Jones_Poster_and_Certificate

Behind us are the A3s for one of the Welsh Health Boards;  ABMU in fact.


An A3 is a way of summarising an improvement project very succinctly – the name comes from the size of paper used.  A3 is the biggest size that will go through an A4 fax machine (i.e. folded over) and the A3 discipline is to be concise and clear at the same time.

The three core questions that the A3 answers are:
Q1: What is the issue?
Q2: What would improvement need to look like?
Q3: How would we know that a change is an improvement?

This display board is one of many in the room, each sharing a succinct story of a different improvement journey and collectively a veritable treasure trove of creativity and discovery.

The A3s were of variable quality … and that is OK and is expected … because like all skills it takes practice. Lots of practice. Perfection is not the goal because it is unachievable. Best is not the goal because only one can be best. Progress is the goal because everyone can progress … and so progress is what we share and what we celebrate.


The event was the Fifth Sharing Event in the Welsh Flow Programme that has been running for just over a year and Chris is the first to earn an ISP-1 Certificate … so we all celebrated with him and shared the story.  It is a team achievement – everyone in the room played a part in some way – as did many more who were not in the room on the day.


stick_figure_look_point_on_cliff_anim_8156Improvement is like mountain walking.

After a tough uphill section we reach a level spot where we can rest; catch our breath; take in the view; reflect on our progress and the slips, trips and breakthroughs along the way; perhaps celebrate with drink and nibble of our chocolate ration; and then get up, look up, and square up for the next uphill bit.

New territory for us.  New challenges and new opportunities to learn and to progress and to celebrate and share our improvement stories.